My Blog

Posts for: October, 2017

By Phillip S. Tully III DMD
October 27, 2017
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: dentures  
ImmediateDenturesProvideYouWithTeethWhileYourGumsHeal

You probably can’t remember a time without your teeth — and can’t imagine life without them. But now it’s a reality: one by one your teeth have become casualties in a long-standing war with dental disease until now they’re all lost.

Total tooth loss (edentulism) can be difficult in more ways than the loss of function — it can be psychologically traumatic as you must now transition from natural teeth to dentures or other restorations. To add to the stress, you probably won’t be able to obtain your permanent restoration immediately because the extraction sites must heal.

To help you with this transition and provide a means for you to have teeth during the healing period, we may fit you with an appliance known as an immediate denture. With these temporary teeth replacements, you can maintain your smile appearance, chew food and speak unimpaired.

Initially, immediate dentures should fit well, but over time your gums will tend to shrink as they heal. This can loosen the dentures’ fit and make them uncomfortable to wear. If the healing process is still ongoing and you still need to wear the immediate dentures, they can be relined with more denture material to fine-tune the fit.

At some point, though, we must consider creating a new, permanent set of dentures. When your mouth is fully healed, we can make a more accurate impression that we can then use to construct your new set. There are also other options, such as using dental implants to support a denture or a fixed bridge. This option will only be possible, however, if you have sufficient bone available to fully support it, which we might also be able to augment with grafting.

Immediate dentures serve a worthwhile purpose, but only for a temporary period. We’ll be happy to discuss all your options with you to help you find the right permanent solution that fits both your mouth’s condition and your financial ability.

If you would like more information on transitioning to teeth replacement, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Immediate Dentures.”


By Dr. Phillip S. Tully III, DMD
October 25, 2017
Category: Oral Health
Tags: family dentistry  

How your Columbus, GA, family dentist can help youfamily dentistry

Your family dentist is important for providing your family with the dental care you need. Here are a few things Dr. Phillip Tully III and Dr. W. Newton Sharp provide:

Sealants:

Sealants are a crucial part of maintaining your child's teeth and avoiding cavities. Getting dental sealants is not difficult or painful. Your Columbus dentist will clean and dry the tooth, then apply a gel so that the tooth becomes rougher on the chewing surface. Your doctor will then remove the gel, dry the tooth and apply sealant onto the grooves and expose it to a special blue light to make the sealant hard.

Root Canal:

Root canals are necessary for saving your teeth. A tooth is composed of several layers. The outermost layer is enamel. It's the white part of the tooth and also happens to be the strongest part. When a cavity is deep enough to infiltrate the enamel, it reaches the pulp, which causes pain. Your dentist will need to remove the pulp, clean and disinfect the canal from any bacteria remaining then seal the canal to prevent any more bacteria from entering.

Veneers:

Veneers are an aesthetic fix. They deal with stained or discolored teeth, caused by poor dental hygiene, drinking coffee and tea, smoking or chewing tobacco. You may even consider veneers if your teeth are mishappened.

The process of placing veneers includes your dentist removing some enamel from the surface of your teeth then cementing custom-made veneers. Because your dentist removes some enamel, which is an irreversible process, and because veneers are made out of thin porcelain or plastic, you won't feel like your teeth are protruding. On the contrary, they will feel smooth and properly aligned with the rest of your teeth.

These are only a few of what your Columbus, GA, family dentists provide. If you have any questions or concerns, just call (706) 323-6491.


By Dr. Phillip S. Tully III, DMD
October 25, 2017
Category: Uncategorized
Tags: Untagged

Please join us for our Open House this Thursday, October 26 from 5-7 at 7270 North Lake Drive, Suite 100. 

We are excited for you to see our new Office and meet Dr. Tully, Dr. Sharp and the rest of our team. We will serve light refreshments and have a chance to win our fall goodie basket. We look forward to seeing you!

Here is a sneak peek...


By Phillip S. Tully III DMD
October 12, 2017
Category: Oral Health
FAQsAboutChildrensDentalDevelopment

Watching your newborn develop into a toddler, then an elementary schooler, a teenager, and finally an adult is one of the most exciting and rewarding experiences there is. Throughout the years, you’ll note the passing of many physical milestones — including changes that involve the coming and going of primary and permanent teeth. Here are some answers to frequently asked questions about children’s dental development.

When will I see my baby’s first tooth come in?
The two lower front teeth usually erupt (emerge from the gums) together, between the ages of 6 and 10 months. But your baby’s teeth may come earlier or later. Some babies are even born with teeth! You will know the first tooth is about to come in if you see signs of teething, such as irritability and a lot of drooling. The last of the 20 baby teeth to come in are the 2-year molars, so named for the age at which they erupt.

When do kids start to lose their baby teeth?
Baby teeth are generally lost in the same order in which they appeared, starting with the lower front teeth around age 6. Children will continue to lose their primary teeth until around age 12.

What makes baby teeth fall out?
Pressure from the emerging permanent tooth below the gum will cause the roots of the baby tooth to break down or “resorb” little by little. As more of the root structure disappears, the primary tooth loses its anchorage in the jawbone and falls out.

When will I know if my child needs braces?
Bite problems (malocclusions) usually become apparent when a child has a mixture of primary and permanent teeth, around age 6-8. Certain malocclusions are easier to treat while a child’s jaw is still growing, before puberty is reached. Using appliances designed for this purpose, orthodontists can actually influence the growth and development of a child’s jaw — to make more room for crowded teeth, for example. We can discuss interceptive orthodontics more fully with you at your child’s next appointment.

When do wisdom teeth come in and why do they cause problems?
Wisdom teeth (also called third molars) usually come in between the ages of 17 and 25. By that time, there may not be enough room in the jaw to accommodate them — or they may be positioned to come in at an angle instead of vertically. Either of these situations can cause them to push against the roots of a neighboring tooth and become trapped beneath the gum, which is known as impaction. An impacted wisdom tooth may lead to an infection or damage to adjacent healthy teeth. That it is why it is important for developing wisdom teeth to be monitored regularly at the dental office.

If you have additional questions about your child’s dental development, please contact us or schedule a consultation. You can also learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Losing a Baby Tooth” and “The Importance of Baby Teeth.”